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Covboy69 (Chemical) (OP)
22 Jun 11 7:08

Hi,

Odd question but hoping you can shed some light on it (and hoping I've posted it in roughly the right forum);

In a lot of engineering departments at universities, a "marcet boiler" is used to investigate the relationship between the pressure and temperature of saturated steam, in equilibrium with water.

We're looking for info on the origins of the name of this bit of kit and wondered if anyone knew? Even some of the manufacturers seem to not knwo where it comes from...

Googling jsut results in lots of suppliers data sheets and lab reports/instructions for using it to learn the theory, but no actual history of the product or name...
ione (Mechanical)
22 Jun 11 7:49
It always depend the way you use google.

http://www.uh.edu/engines/epi1302.htm
Covboy69 (Chemical) (OP)
22 Jun 11 8:18
Wow! Thats great! It seems I tried but failed with miserably with Google!

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