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OSUWE2010 (Structural) (OP)
8 Jun 11 9:29
Looking through the code I can't find where they directly talk about unequal leg lengths in fillet welds and I wanted to know if this was legal or not. As I take it as long as the smallest of the leg sizes meets the correct weld size everything is ok..am I right thinking this and where can I find it in the code addressing this situation. Thanks!  
 
connectegr (Structural)
8 Jun 11 10:15
un-equal leg sizes are OK.  

"unequal leg fillet welds", fillet weld size is defined as, "the leg lengths of the largest right triangle that can be inscribed with the fillet cross section"  

I have never specified a unequal leg size. But, note that the actual strength is relative to the leg size and the material strength.  For example if you are welding a lap joint with Grade 50 plate lapped on an A36 plate.  Unequal leg sizes could be the same capacity.   

http://www.FerrellEngineering.com

cloa (Petroleum)
8 Jun 11 18:56
Better to post on ASME forum or  what ever code's forum that you are referring to.
MikeHalloran (Mechanical)
11 Jun 11 1:19
One time, I specified unequal leg length welds, in order to eliminate machining bolt head clearance in a joint between a thick tube and a much thicker bolted flange in a mechanical assembly.

I.e., I wanted the longer leg on the thinner part, which is very nontraditional.

The welders either ignored or misinterpreted the drawing, so we had to do even more back-spotfacing than we would have if I had specified equal leg lengths.

One time.

 

Mike Halloran
Pembroke Pines, FL, USA

HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
14 Jun 11 15:09
Counteranecdote:

Unequal fillet legs are a standard Texas DOT detail for the base plates of high mast illumination poles.  And no, the poles that fell down did not do so because of this detail.

Hg
 

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DWHA (Structural)
15 Jun 11 18:11
They are also used in areas subject to high vibrations.

For example if you have a somewhat flexable member cantilevered from a rigid base. A 2:1 weld is sometime used.  Where the leg length along the cantilever is 2 time longer than the leg length along the rigid base.

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