Smart questions
Smart answers
Smart people
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Member Login




Remember Me
Forgot Password?
Join Us!

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips now!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

Join Eng-Tips
*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Donate Today!

Do you enjoy these
technical forums?
Donate Today! Click Here

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.
Jobs from Indeed

Link To This Forum!

Partner Button
Add Stickiness To Your Site By Linking To This Professionally Managed Technical Forum.
Just copy and paste the
code below into your site.

metman (Materials)
20 Feb 11 4:00
Only in recent years have I seen on the door of male intended water closets (oops giving away my age)the inscription MENS.

To see it written that way seems really wierd after seeing it for so many long years written as MEN.

I suppose this is just another example of written vs spoken English as in the email/emails debate in the equipment"s" thread.

Nobody will say, "the men room is down that hallway."  But when one arrives at the door of the mens room it should say, "men" which is already plural meaning that a pluralism of men could be expected to go through that door.  Or I guess it could read, "MAN."  Man door is often used in place of personnel door which of course cannot be PC these days.

If I don't see some really witty posts on this, I will be sorely disappointed.

SomptingGuy (Automotive)
20 Feb 11 4:30
Surely it should be MEN'S if it's a short form of MEN'S ROOM?

Some pubs around here have "Tool Shed".  One or two have "Cottage".

- Steve

Helpful Member!  pmover (Mechanical)
20 Feb 11 14:49
"men" is the plural form of "man".

"mens" is not in the dictionary, at least the dictionary i have.
-pmover
Helpful Member!(2)  msquared48 (Structural)
20 Feb 11 15:22
Men's is possessive.  It's still a word that is commonly used, regardless of any dictionary.

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering
Motto:  KISS
Motivation:  Don't ask

TenPenny (Mechanical)
21 Feb 11 10:49
It should say 'Men' or 'Men's', one or the other.
logoslarry (Mechanical)
21 Feb 11 13:11
I always thought of it a Latin survivor.
 From Cassell's : mens 1(b) the mind as the seat of feeling or thought.
 Rather appropriate I'd say.
TJOrlowski (Mechanical)
21 Feb 11 13:30
If the word appears as a modifier to what type of room it is, then "Men's" is appropriate.

Ie.  Men's Room, Men's Lavatory, Men's Toilet, etc.

If the word appears by itself, and acts as direction for those that are permitted to enter, then Men is appropriate.

Ie. Men (you should enter here), or Women (men, you should NOT enter here)

-TJ Orlowski

msquared48 (Structural)
21 Feb 11 13:42
Personally, as opposed to the women's room, I think we should rename ours "Mensa Room".

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering
Motto:  KISS
Motivation:  Don't ask

rb1957 (Aerospace)
22 Feb 11 8:57
4U2P ?
SomptingGuy (Automotive)
22 Feb 11 8:59
Hispes/Herpes

- Steve

Twoballcane (Mechanical)
22 Feb 11 10:15
I've been in a bar where they had the just symbols.  The toilet symbol for the girls, and then for the boys a bunch of guys around a bathtub standing up peeing into it.  

 

Tobalcane
"If you avoid failure, you also avoid success."
"Luck is where preparation meets opportunity"  

KENAT (Mechanical)
22 Feb 11 15:46
Sompting, I've heard about those type of public bathrooms in your neck of the woods.  

Cottaging never caught my fancy.

Posting guidelines FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies http://eng-tips.com/market.cfm? (probably not aimed specifically at you)
What is Engineering anyway: FAQ1088-1484: In layman terms, what is "engineering"?

jmw (Industrial)
23 Feb 11 4:53
M248 do we say that with an italian accent?

JMW
www.ViscoAnalyser.com

 

Ron (Structural)
26 Feb 11 19:28
Mike is right...it's the possessive form of a plural noun...what's the problem?
ahsaft (Mechanical)
26 Feb 11 23:38
Should it be men's, or mens'?
CajunCenturion (Computer)
28 Feb 11 11:07
==> Should it be men's, or mens'?
Men is already plural; therefore, the possessive is men's.

Good Luck
--------------
As a circle of light increases so does the circumference of darkness around it. - Albert Einstein

SomptingGuy (Automotive)
28 Feb 11 11:20
Shall we crank up the old its versus it's discussions?

- Steve

fcsuper (Mechanical)
28 Feb 11 15:39
jgailla (Geotechnical)
28 Feb 11 18:36
Men's is the proper spelling.  The usage of xxxs' is for nouns ending in s, such as many plurals or names.
An example would be Carlos' pants.  Sorry, couldn't think of a better example.
casseopeia (Structural)
28 Feb 11 23:43
metman, you mean MENS, with or without an apostrophe, is the only word on the door?  And you've seen this more than once?!?That is so wrong...

"Gorgeous hair is the best revenge."  Ivana Trump

metman (Materials)
4 Mar 11 18:44
casseopeia --

An LPS for you!  That is how it struck me.  Why append an "S" on it?  But if you are going  do it, add the apostrophe.

There is a word for this act of unecessary colloquial wording but the best thing that comes to mind is;  stupid.

casseopeia (Structural)
5 Mar 11 0:21
thanks metman, even if my LPS is invisible.  

This thread reminds me of a discussion I've had since moving to the 'hood.  People in these parts do not say 'it's mine'.  They say 'it's MINES'.  I attempted to correct someone once and they looked confused and said well if it's yours, then it's mines.

I didn't have an answer for that one.  But it still makes me laugh when I hear it.

"Gorgeous hair is the best revenge."  Ivana Trump

SomptingGuy (Automotive)
5 Mar 11 10:11
"Mines" is common in Ireland.  So I'm not surprised it's heard in the USA (at least 100% of Americans are Irish).
 

- Steve

JohnRBaker (Mechanical)
5 Mar 11 17:55
Irrespective of what the title of the page is or the text used on the page, from the signs being offered, it appears that at least with this vendor, the proper term is Men and not Men's:

http://www.justbathroomsigns.com/Restroom/Mens-Room-Signs.aspx

But I did learn one thing and that's that there are special signs just for California.  Now we immigrated here nearly 31 years ago (from Michigan) and I travel all over the world for my job, but I never really paid much attention to the fact that virtually every public restroom in the state really DOES use the same style and type of signage...

http://www.justbathroomsigns.com/Restroom/California-Mens-Room-Signs.aspx

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.org/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

rmw (Mechanical)
12 Mar 11 16:58
That's your tax dollars at work.  Someone probably makes mid six figures each year to determine that and keep it so.

rmw
djack77494 (Chemical)
5 Apr 11 9:51
The Men's Room is for men and the Women's Room is for women.
twalter (Electrical)
5 Apr 11 12:05
Flew into Auckland Airport.  

Long flight, and didn't see a rest room sign. Asked the friendly New Zealand Information lady... Rest Room?   She pointed me down the way, and sure enough was a room set up with cots for taking a quick nap.  

Went back out and said I was looking for the bath room.  Yes, finally a different location. It was a showering facility.

By the time I wondered back out I finally explained TOILET while crossing my legs.  Oh Dear, the Loo is right behind you. O and OO. I still don't remember which was men's or women's, but was just happy to have found a rest room!



 
JohnRBaker (Mechanical)
5 Apr 11 15:50

Quote (twalter):


Oh Dear, the Loo is right behind you. O and OO. I still don't remember which was men's or women's...

I would think that that would be obvious winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.org/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

jraef (Electrical)
15 Apr 11 0:42
There used to be a lot of bars on Haight St. in San Francisco (the old hippie Haight-Ashbury district) that caters primarily to gay men. On a pub crawl with my wife and another couple one night in the 80's, the women had to relieve themselves so we stumbled into one not realizing. My buddy Dave and I stood at the bar and ordered drinks while we waited, the women came back really fast and said we had to go. That was about when our eyes adjusted and we realized where we were. The wives said there was no "Ladies Room", but there were two toilets, one marked Fems, one marked Butches. They went into the Fems. It didn't mean what they thought it did.  

"If I had eight hours to chop down a tree, I'd spend six sharpening my axe." -- Abraham Lincoln  
For the best use of Eng-Tips, please click here -> FAQ731-376: Eng-Tips.com Forum Policies  

davidbeach (Electrical)
15 Apr 11 23:55
Was in a pool hall/bar in Moscow, Idaho (University of Idaho) in the summer of '79.  Two rooms, one labeled "Cues", one labeled "Pockets".  Every since, that's been my favorite "cute" restroom signage.
JohnRBaker (Mechanical)
16 Apr 11 1:29
That reminds me of the dance scene in the bar from the Jeff Daniels' movie 'Escanaba in da Moonlight'. Unfortunately they had to remove it from the theatrical release, but if you buy the DVD it's included in the 'deleted scenes' and you can see it there.  Without getting too graphic, it involved the men and women lining up on opposite sides of the dance floor with pool cues and rolls of toilet paper held between their respective knees (I'll let your imagination fill in the rest of the 'details').

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.org/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

msquared48 (Structural)
28 Jul 11 14:35
Walked into one yesterday that said "Mens Restrooms".

Go figure.

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering

 

MintJulep (Mechanical)
28 Jul 11 14:57

Quote (JohnRBaker):

I would think that that would be obvious winky smile

O for #1 and OO for #2?
JohnRBaker (Mechanical)
28 Jul 11 20:00
NO!   'O' for men, 'OO' for women winky smile

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

metman (Materials)
30 Jul 11 9:04

Quote:

NO!   'O' for men, 'OO' for women

I don't know if the question and/or the answer might be inappropriate for this forum but the symbolism (abbreviation?) escapes me.

Why 'O' for men, 'OO' for women?

msquared48 (Structural)
30 Jul 11 17:12
Because when men see a bathroom sign, they say "Oh."

When women see a bathroom sign, they say "Oh Oh."

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering

 

JohnRBaker (Mechanical)
31 Jul 11 1:26
You're correct, an unambiguous answer would probably prove to be inappropriate.

John R. Baker, P.E.
Product 'Evangelist'
Product Design Solutions
Siemens PLM Software Inc.
Industry Sector
Cypress, CA
http://www.siemens.com/plm
http://www.plmworld.com/museum/

To an Engineer, the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.
 

lacajun (Electrical)
1 Aug 11 17:39
XY for men. XX for women.  Simple not to mention scientific.
metman (Materials)
2 Aug 11 7:10
lacajun,

OK, by this circuitous path, I see the symbolism but shouldn't that be:

OI for men.  OO for women? But not scientific enough?

But then again, maybe the symbolism is in regard to the equipment in the room rather than the equipment on the people?

lacajun (Electrical)
2 Aug 11 13:01
metman, your symbolism is fine.  Just wanted to throw out the chromosome angle.  But, I'm not sure some would get OI and OO.  In fact, some wouldn't get XY or XX.  sad
metman (Materials)
3 Aug 11 8:41
lacajun,

Yer splittin my guts with laughter.  Sometimes innuendos are so much more fun than bluntness.

lacajun (Electrical)
3 Aug 11 14:18
metman, glad to provide comic relief.  It's a great part of life.
ewh (Aerospace)
3 Aug 11 15:01
Are you sure they shouldn't be XY's and XX's?

"Good to know you got shoes to wear when you find the floor." - Robert Hunter
 

SNORGY (Mechanical)
4 Aug 11 9:55
I think part of the problem is the extra height required for the sign to fit the apostrophe.

Quite unfortunately, the room in question is not the place to have a period.

Regards,

SNORGY.

msquared48 (Structural)
4 Aug 11 12:32
Yea.  Men just have colon problems...

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering

 

metman (Materials)
4 Aug 11 16:37
Would that be colon problems of the A...... variety?

msquared48 (Structural)
4 Aug 11 17:04
There's another?

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering

 

ewh (Aerospace)
5 Aug 11 9:42
:

"Good to know you got shoes to wear when you find the floor." - Robert Hunter
 

SNORGY (Mechanical)
5 Aug 11 19:03
;   <-- usually representative of a solution to the problem

Regards,

SNORGY.

msquared48 (Structural)
5 Aug 11 21:31
Cole on dude!

Mike McCann
MMC Engineering

 

metman (Materials)
11 Aug 11 16:32

Quote (SomptingGuy (Automotive)    20 Feb 11 4:30 ):

Surely it should be MEN'S if it's a short form of MEN'S ROOM?

A few days ago downtown in a 100 year old building there was a sign on a door;  MEN'S.

I really don't see the need for the S but at least they used correct abbreviated punctuation.


 

lacajun (Electrical)
12 Aug 11 14:30
Men and Women are generally in such a snit to get into "the room" I bet they don't care what's on the door.

I don't have a problem with the possessive for restrooms; however, I've always thought of both as "Men" and "Women."  They're kinda' like traffic directions for cars vs. buses.  Cars go here, Buses go here.  Men go here.  Women go here.  But, I have a simple mind.
metman (Materials)
12 Aug 11 17:40
lacajun,

I think that is most people's take on it but there always has to be a few to tinker with variations on a theme.

SNORGY (Mechanical)
12 Aug 11 22:52
Maybe they should just put buttons on the doors.

Buttons on the right = men; on the left = women.

Those wearing zippers or velcro just have to wait until they get home.

Regards,

SNORGY.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close