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Capacity design procedure-single storey buildings

Capacity design procedure-single storey buildings

(OP)
Hi all, I have a single storey structural steel frame building.  I am designing in NZ, under NZS3404.  My question is, if I designate this structure as a category 1 (fully ductile) frame, even though it is single storey, what checks need to be completed specifically relating to seismic capacity design.

I would expect a ducility of 4 or greater to be acheivable with these structures, but am just after confirmation on the subsequent required checks to ensure code compliance.The wind case is generally the dominant lateral load case.  

Regardless, to assign this ductility I know there are other things to check, even for a simple single storey moment resisting frame, and am after advice on what other engineers check.Guidance from those of you familiar with the NZ design procedures would be much appreciated.  I am relatively new to seismic design, hence why I am after the help!Thanking you in advance.Mel  
 

RE: Capacity design procedure-single storey buildings

Mel, I am surprised you haven't had a reply yet. While I have designed for seismic zones I have taken the easy way out and designed as an elastically responding structure. Make sure it is worth the effort to design for ductility. This is especially so if wind is the dominant lateral load case.

 

RE: Capacity design procedure-single storey buildings

(OP)
Hi sdz, thanks for the reply.  I think that nearly all engineers do as you say, and stick within the elastic range.  I generally do also, I must admit.

Any other NZ structural engineers out there who would care to comment??

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