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Pipes Crossing Slopes

Pipes Crossing Slopes

(OP)
How would you model a pipeline that is crossing a slope. The cases can be:
1-The pipeline is pressurized and is relatively shallow below below the body of the slope/fill (in the foundation soil).
2-The pipeline is pressurized and is cutting through the bottom of the fill (right above the foundation soil).
3-The pipeline is not pressurized and is relatively shallow below the body of the slope/fill (in the foundation soil).
4-The pipeline is not pressurized and is cutting through the bottom of the fill (right above the foundation soil).
5-Any impact to the assumptions/approach if the pipes cross seepage slurry walls.

In all cases the pipes will be above bedding material (6 inches to 18 inches thick) with unknown compaction conditions around the pipes. These pipes are either concrete or steel pipes. They range in diameter between 8 inches and 72 inches.
 

RE: Pipes Crossing Slopes

what are you looking for? anticipated settlement? has the fill slope already been constructed or will it be built after the pipe is installed? there's no idea of compaction around pipe?

RE: Pipes Crossing Slopes

If you can,   use plaxis! Tha will give you all the stress stain conditions around your pipe.

RE: Pipes Crossing Slopes

Can't tell what you are analyzing from what you wrote, but unless the pipes leak badly, whether they are pressurized or not isn't relevant.  For slope stability, the worst case may be empty pipe at the toe (weight of air), or full pipe higher on the slope (weight of water).

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