Smart questions
Smart answers
Smart people
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Member Login




Remember Me
Forgot Password?
Join Us!

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips now!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

Join Eng-Tips
*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Donate Today!

Do you enjoy these
technical forums?
Donate Today! Click Here

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.
Jobs from Indeed

Link To This Forum!

Partner Button
Add Stickiness To Your Site By Linking To This Professionally Managed Technical Forum.
Just copy and paste the
code below into your site.

wiazco (Geotechnical) (OP)
12 Jul 10 15:46
If I know the natural water content, max dry density, and the optimum water content of a soil, how do you calculate how much water needs to added to acheive optimum water content for a volume of soil? Thanks very much.
Helpful Member!  Ron (Structural)
12 Jul 10 21:23
OK...you're obviously not a geotechnical engineer or you would know this, so I'll assume your handle is an attempt to categorize your problem, not a statement of your expertise.

If you know the moisture content and you know the optimum moisture content, the difference between the two is the amount of moisture you need.  Assuming that you'll compact to the max dry density, then the difference multiplied by the max dry density is the weight of water you will need.  Divide that value by 8.34 lbs/gal(if your density is in lbs/ft^3) or 1kg/l (if your density is in kg/m^3) (someone probably needs to check my conversion!)
Helpful Member!  fattdad (Geotechnical)
14 Jul 10 8:54
As presented in your other post:

If you have one 2,000 pounds of soil with a moisture content of 12 percent and you want it to be 18 percent you do the following:  2,000 x (0.18-0.12) = 100 pounds

That's how much water to add.

f-d   

¡papá gordo ain't no madre flaca!

Dozerman56 (Civil/Environmental)
16 Jul 10 19:44
If you're trying to make compaction, bear in mind that while this calc will give you a rough idea, you're probably losing moisture to evaporation at the same time.  

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close