Smart questions
Smart answers
Smart people
Join Eng-Tips Forums
INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Member Login




Remember Me
Forgot Password?
Join Us!

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips now!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

Join Eng-Tips
*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.
Jobs from Indeed

Link To This Forum!

Partner Button
Add Stickiness To Your Site By Linking To This Professionally Managed Technical Forum.
Just copy and paste the
code below into your site.

carlosgw (Mechanical) (OP)
21 Mar 10 20:49
Cord and plug cords can not be installed above suspended ceiling. Condensate pumps need to be installed above the ceiling all the time. Do you know a condensate pump without a cord and plug?
HerrKaLeun (Mechanical)
21 Mar 10 20:58
I think most condensate pumps are hard-wired. You mean a condensate pump for a cooling coil above ceiling, like in a VRF system?  
steamdog (Chemical)
22 Mar 10 7:40
I am sure many manufacturer's have hard wired pumps.  The one I am familiar with does: Hartell
 
carlosgw (Mechanical) (OP)
22 Mar 10 8:13
I mean a small pump serving a one coil (in my current application- a furnace). Most come with a plug and cord. Including Hartell (that I saw). I am concerned that changing to hard wired in the field will affect the UL listing).
willard3 (Mechanical)
22 Mar 10 9:39
You must be asking about cooling condensate pumps.

Steam driven condensate pumps w/o cord and plug are common.
steamdog (Chemical)
22 Mar 10 23:07
scroll through the Hartell catalog, they have hard wired small condensate pumps
RossABQ (Mechanical)
24 Mar 10 0:27
Since you also need to run a secondary pan drain down to a "conspicuous place", why not run the main drain to a pump that's in a closet or mechanical room?  These pumps are not "industrial grade" in many respects, potential for failure and a wet ceiling is very real.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!

Back To Forum

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close