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What does rating 3000,6000,9000 means as per ASME B 16.11Helpful Member! 

pipexp (Mechanical) (OP)
22 Dec 08 2:11
Dear experts,
Can any body suggest what does rating 3000,6000 and 9000 etc. means as per ASME B 16.11. What should test pressure for items produced in rating 9000.
 
Helpful Member!  nickelkid (Mechanical)
22 Dec 08 8:50
B16.11 fittings have a Class: 3000, 6000, and 9000 (for SW).  The applicable piping code is needed to determine the rating of the fitting in addition to: material, temperature, corrosion allowance, etc... B16.11 does not require pressure testing, but the fitting is required to be capable of withstanding an equivalent test pressure of seamless pipe constructed of material equivalent to the fitting. Take a look at section 2 of B16.11.
BigInch (Petroleum)
22 Dec 08 9:37
The WOG rating is the maximum nonshock pressure, expressed in psi for which the pressure-containing parts are rated when -20F and 150F for bronze-body and cast-iron body valves and -20F and 100F for steel-body valves.

test at up to 1.5 x rated pressure

**********************
"Pumping systems account for nearly 20% of the world's energy used by electric motors and 25% to 50% of the total electrical energy usage in certain industrial facilities." - DOE statistic  (Note: Make that 99.99% for pipeline companies) http://virtualpipeline.spaces.live.com/

StevenHPerry (Mechanical)
31 Dec 08 13:39
I don't believe BigInch's reply applies to B16.11 fittings.  Section 2 of B16.11 does not indicate the ratings are WOG ratings.

Class 2000, 3000, 6000, 9000 are just designations.

Read section 2 and see, especially, table 2.  Then go back into the dimensional tables and look at dimension "G".  Those numbers should be familiar.

BigInch (Petroleum)
2 Jan 09 14:46
I said WOG ratings can be tested to 1.50.  That's true.  However I did say that more of as add on comment to RC's test pressure comment, rather than as an answer to the OP.
Sorry for any confusion.

**********************
"Pumping accounts for 20% of the world's energy used by electric motors and 25% to 50% of the total electrical energy usage in certain industrial facilities." - DOE statistic  (Note: Make that 99.99% for pipeline companies) http://virtualpipeline.spaces.live.com/

colar (Mechanical)
2 May 09 22:49
I notice in many specs that people put the pound sign as in "3000#" fittings beside the spec.  Again is this just classification as opposed to reading anything into the lb symbol (like as in psi)?
JohnBreen (Mechanical)
4 May 09 16:08
The "pound" designation is a artifact from another time period (it is "olde fashioned").  ASME changed "3000 pound" to "class 3000" years ago because there was confusion about the meaning (psig? well, no...).  Similarly, "6 inch" pipe is more correctly NPS 6 pipe and IPS is now NPS.  Things change, "ASA" went through several changes until it arrived at "ANSI" but it is amusing to see that since some organizations copy their specifications from one project to the next that some of them still refer to the older designations.
JLSeagull (Electrical)
4 May 09 16:40
"...it is amusing to see that since some" - dinosaurs - "copy their specifications from one project to the next that some of them still refer to the older designations."  
JohnGP (Mechanical)
4 May 09 17:16
It's so ingrained though. People much "younger" than I still persist with "300 lb" flanges, for example. In conversation, I admit I might sometimes say "6 inch" pipe, but on paper it will be "DN 150".
DSB123 (Mechanical)
5 May 09 5:16
JLSeagull,
          You must remember if it were not for some of these "dinosaurs" you would not exist!!!
doses (Mechanical)
5 May 09 13:31
Thanks a lot Mr. Breen for your post, that's why I always keep comming back to read this forum.
Even I'm a young engineer, I've seen many mistakes and misunderstandings relating to class designations of fittings, valves, etc. As an example, few days ago I had a discussion with another engineer because he said: "valves don't have class, so doesn´t matter if we change a valve from class 150 to 300, it only applies to flanges"... After a while and many books and ASME standars open over the table, he finally understood that valves have class like fittings and flanges.

David.

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