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Hockeytownkid (Mechanical) (OP)
24 Nov 08 10:28
Right now I am teaching "Introduction to Fluid Power" as an adjunct instructor at a local college.  Next semester I am scheduled to teach "Advanced Fluid Power".  The curriculum is new to this college so they do not have any texts that they are currently using.  I am building classroom materials as I go.  I was wondering if anyone has a recommendation on an excellent "Advance Fluid Power" text?
Helpful Member!  PNachtwey (Electrical)
24 Nov 08 11:11
If the advanced class is about servo hydraulics then there are books by Jack L Johnson.
The books may be a little expensive.

Another cheaper option is
Hydraulic System Analysis.  The book is dated but the physics of hydraulics is not.  It was written for Boeing engineers.

http://www.hydraulicspneumatics.com/Bookstore/


 
Hockeytownkid (Mechanical) (OP)
24 Nov 08 12:05
PNachtwey, thank you for the help.  It just so happens that for the "Introduction" class this term I am using James L. Johnson's text "Introduction to Fluid Power", which has been great.  It is obvious that you are familiar with his work.  However, I can't seem to find his next logical progression from that book to something more advanced dealing with hydraulics and pneumatics.  Any particular text comes to mind from there?
PNachtwey (Electrical)
24 Nov 08 22:06
It is Jack L Johnson that wrote the books on the hydraulics and pneumatics website.  Yes I am familiar with is work and I have two of his books and a video.

What exactly are you trying to teach?  My area of expertise is the physics of hydraulic as it is applied to hydraulic servo control and modeling. Did you look at the ebooks on the Hydraulics and Pneumatics website?  

Hydraulics is a big topic. The is mobile hydraulics, low power hydraulics, servo control.  There are new topics like hybrid drive hydraulics.  Even keeping oil off the ground, keeping it clean and chemistry of oil is important.

There is plenty of information in the article archives of the "hydraulic and pneumatics".  Both Jack and I write articles for H&P.
 

 
Hockeytownkid (Mechanical) (OP)
25 Nov 08 9:00
I realized after I posted the thread that James and Jack are not the same.  The middle initial and last name got me.  Do you know James as well?

As for what we are trying to teach, you have raised a good question.  At first I was going to teach advanced controls as they are related to pneumatics and hydraulics in Oil Refining.  I am a Sr. Engineer at one.  But I have been questioning myself if that is the best subject matter to teach these particular type of students.  I think it is too focused to one industry so I have been looking to broaden the curriculem.  The students in my courses are laid off blue collar workers looking to retool their skills with an associates degree in industrial equipment (maintainence and operation of).  The introduction class hit all 13 chapters of James' book (basic priciples of hydraulics and pneumatics, pumps, controls, motors, ancillary components, etc.).  There are only two classes on hydraulics and pneumatics in the studies for the associate degree.  With only one 15 week course left with this subject, what would you recommend to teach them that would make them more marketable in today's industries?

That is the question I have been struggling with over the last month.  There is more to H&P than what two classes teach, and I want to make sure I am giving them the right tools, not just the tools in my narrow focused industry.
Helpful Member!  maytag (Industrial)
25 Nov 08 9:43
I do some training with the "blue collar", both formal and informal settings.  Its been my experience that most
"maintenance" people will benefit from the 'hands on" labs.  
Bud Trinkel, that frequents this forum has some excellent material for both basic and more advanced classes.
Maytag
Hockeytownkid (Mechanical) (OP)
25 Nov 08 10:23
Maytag, it is funny you mention that.  I do have 3 trainers in the classroom (one just hydraulic, one just pneumatic, and one that is both).  The downside is that they are from the 70's and I can not get updated materials for them.  The upside is they still work and I have been incorporating them into the classes as best as I can.  I agree with the hands on.  Thanks.
maytag (Industrial)
25 Nov 08 11:06
The discipline has not changed over the years.  The intergration of more electrical controls has provided a lot on options/flexibility but a maintenance man needs the fluid power principles from the ground up.  I recommend the same regarding other mechanical training i.e. shaft alignment-there are laser alignment tools that lower the skills required to do a proper alignment, BUT if a student is only taught that method what happens when he is thrown into a environment where a laser can't be used.
Maytag
Helpful Member!  budt (Industrial)
25 Nov 08 12:25
Take a look at the books I wrote to teach Basics and an Advanced Class on Circuits that can be used to study how circuits are designed and/or perform.

The basic book is all there, the advanced circuits book is only partially up. http://www.hydraulicspneumatics.com/200/eBooks/

I also have a Trouble Shooting book that will be on the web site later.
 

Bud Trinkel, Fluid Power Consultant
HYDRA-PNEU CONSULTING

Hockeytownkid (Mechanical) (OP)
25 Nov 08 15:23
BudT, do you use your Fluid Power Circuits Explained book for your advanced class?   
budt (Industrial)
25 Nov 08 17:25
"BudT, do you use your Fluid Power Circuits Explained book for your advanced class?"

For most classes I do since most are ultimately interested in being able to ead a schematic and diagnose circuit failures. Basics can familiarize students with components and help them understand the symbols but does not allow any time to cover anything but the rudimentary circuits the parts are used in.

As I mentioned before I use a Hydraulic Trouble Shooting book for the local apprentice class since that was what they requested.

The Trouble Shooting class is over 70% learning the circuits and components. It has an abreviated Fluid Power Circuits Explained section to study correct circuits. That is followed by a section on Component specfic operation and failure modes. Next is a section for identifying parts from symbols on a working schematic. That is followed by a section with schematics that have wrong components or other wrong information. There is a written explanation of how the circuit was designed to operate followed by an explanation of some possible Mal-functions with information on how the coponents are performing. The student must write an explanation of what should be done to make the ciircuit perform as designed.

That is followed by what I call Exercises in Reverse Trouble Shooting. Questions are posed for possible failure modes and the student must write in what component/components could be resposible for the problem.

The last section has five actual working circuits with questiions on failure modes that must be answered by explaining what compont/components could cause the problem. When the class is on site this section has circuits from that company and have been color coded beforehand or can be part of the students class time work. This adds cost but is better for the students and company. Actually I have made these types of circuits over the years for machine specific classes. The prep time usually cost a lot more than classroom time.

There is also a section on Symbols that is from Chapter 4 of the basic book. It shows the symbol with a cutaway of a part the symbol represents.

The Circuits and Trouble Shooting class should be done with time between classes since a lot of work is done by the student and turned in for grading.

I always start the classes with a Pre-Test, partly to see if anyone already knows the subject, but mainly to give the student an idea of what to expect. It is always interesting to see the difference in Pre and Post test's since they are essentialy the same test with different answers.

I have class outlines and test's for all the books plus masters for Overhead transparencies. Most are B&W but the circuits are color coded for easier reading.

 

Bud Trinkel, Fluid Power Consultant
HYDRA-PNEU CONSULTING

PNachtwey (Electrical)
26 Nov 08 2:51
Given that your students are just going for associates degrees I would start with Bud's books.

If the students are going to be designers then I would look at the books I recommended.  

Your focus is too narrow if you are just looking oil refinery applications.  Even the industrial hydraulic market has a very wide range of applications.  


 
Hockeytownkid (Mechanical) (OP)
26 Nov 08 9:48
Gentlemen, I think I have found a text book for my class.  I really appreciate the recommendations.

Bud, Is the Ebook the only way to get a copy of the Circuits Explained book?  Also, and I realize I am asking a lot, I am curious to see your class outlines and tests for this same book.  I have a feeling it woud simplify my life tremendously.  I would understand if that is imposing too much.

Everyone, have a Great Thanksgiving!
budt (Industrial)
26 Nov 08 10:21
Actually the books were made for my own use with the thought they might have commercial value to persons in the Fluid Power industry or teachers that wanted to teach Basics, Circuit Design or Trouble Shooting. To that end I offered them for sale as a supplement to my Social Security monthly checks. As I said before, Sales Were so Underwhelming that when H&P asked to put them on their web site it seemed like  great way for free advertisement though I knew some would print them for their own use, as I had done for other books H&P presented in the past. Usually I bought the books I printed for my librry.

I have a list of 81 books on Fluid Power, Hydraulics, Pneumatics, by a bunch of authors over the years. I looked in my library and found 35 that I had purchased or had been passed on to me by customers or students, one from their deceased Fathers estate.

Then I looked at a list of books on Electric and Electronics and found 3-400, of which many were text's for classes. A noticeable difference from the Fluid power worlds offering.


Bud Trinkel, Fluid Power Consultant
HYDRA-PNEU CONSULTING
AcesHighJoker (Mechanical)
29 Dec 08 22:41
For what it's worth. Eaton's "Fluid Power Industrial Hydraulics Manual" 4th edition was the only text I used aside from the formula packets produced by my instructors to pass the International Fluid Power Society's "Certified Fluid Power Hydraulic Specialist" examination. (If that's not a mouthful...)
(We also had to take a Statics and Strengths of Materials course as well as a couple of electrical circuit courses prior to testing.)


Pneumatics training was the book: "Industrial Pneumatic Technology" from Parker Bulletin 0275-B1
kebecano (Mechanical)
20 Feb 09 8:55
"As I mentioned before I use a Hydraulic Trouble Shooting book for the local apprentice class since that was what they requested.

The Trouble Shooting class is over 70% learning the circuits and components. It has an abreviated Fluid Power Circuits Explained section to study correct circuits. That is followed by a section on Component specfic operation and failure modes. Next is a section for identifying parts from symbols on a working schematic. That is followed by a section with schematics that have wrong components or other wrong information. There is a written explanation of how the circuit was designed to operate followed by an explanation of some possible Mal-functions with information on how the coponents are performing. The student must write an explanation of what should be done to make the ciircuit perform as designed.

That is followed by what I call Exercises in Reverse Trouble Shooting. Questions are posed for possible failure modes and the student must write in what component/components could be resposible for the problem.

The last section has five actual working circuits with questiions on failure modes that must be answered by explaining what compont/components could cause the problem. When the class is on site this section has circuits from that company and have been color coded beforehand or can be part of the students class time work. This adds cost but is better for the students and company. Actually I have made these types of circuits over the years for machine specific classes. The prep time usually cost a lot more than classroom time."

Bud T, is this troubleshooting class available in book form? What you mention is very interesting. I would like to get some more book and information concerning troubleshooting in order to have a better vision of the systems I deal with etc.

Thank you for any resources you can indicate to me.
budt (Industrial)
20 Feb 09 10:55
"Bud T, is this troubleshooting class available in book form? What you mention is very interesting. I would like to get some more book and information concerning troubleshooting in order to have a better vision of the systems I deal with etc."

Yes, all my books were originally written for personal use for classes I taught. Now I find they have commercial use and sales of them can supplement my SS checks.

I have attached brochures, I THINK, that give content and price. Print themon a color printer to see the details.


 

Bud Trinkel, Fluid Power Consultant
HYDRA-PNEU CONSULTING

budt (Industrial)
20 Feb 09 10:57
Looks like I only get one at a time so here is another one:
 

Bud Trinkel, Fluid Power Consultant
HYDRA-PNEU CONSULTING

budt (Industrial)
20 Feb 09 10:58
And the last one.

Bud Trinkel, Fluid Power Consultant
HYDRA-PNEU CONSULTING

Hockeytownkid (Mechanical) (OP)
20 Feb 09 11:03
Just to let everyone know, the college has procured the Fluid Power Circuits Explained book.  We are on our 7th class now and following the outline Bud provides the class is going smoothly, we are working the explained circuits on the trainers (I have 3 to use) and I feel the students are getting their money's worth out of the class.

Thanks Bud for the help.

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