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Diesel Fuel Classes

Diesel Fuel Classes

(OP)
As referred to in NFPA, what class of fuel is No. 2 diesel?

NFPA, International Fire Code, etc. refer to fuels as Class IIIB, or Class II, and so on. Where can I find a simple list in laymen's terms of what fuels fall into which classes.

RE: Diesel Fuel Classes

Perhaps you are looking for the NFPA 3O information.  You need to verify the flash point for the Number 2 fuel oil as several specifications exist.  Marine Diesel may be lower than road or non road Diesel.

Lacking other data, consider ASTM D 396 grade No. 2 S500 for domesting home heating oil.  ASTM D 396 shows No 2 S500 and S5000 with a minimum flash point of 38 degree C.

Class IA Liquid —Any liquid that has a flash point below
73°F (22.8°C) and a boiling point below 100°F (37.8°C)
Class IB Liquid —Any liquid that has a flash point below
73°F (22.8°C) and a boiling point at or above 100°F
(37.8°C)
Class IC Liquid — Any liquid that has a flash point at or
above 73°F (22.8°C), but below 100°F (37.8°C)
Class II Liquid — Any liquid that has a flash point at or
above 100°F (37.8°C) and below 140°F (60°C)
Class III Liquid — Any liquid that has a flash point at or
above 140°F (60°C)
Class IIIA Liquid—Any liquid that has a flash point at
or above 140°F (60°C), but below 200°F (93°C)
Class IIIB Liquid—Any liquid that has a flash point at
or above 200°F (93°C)
...

RE: Diesel Fuel Classes

http://flashoffroad.com/Diesel/DieselFuel/about_diesel_fuel.htm

Diesel fuel lies in the middle of the refined petroleum hierarchy and is considered one of the middle distillates -- slightly heavier than kerosene and slightly lighter than industrial (bunker) fuel oil.  Like automotive gasoline, diesel fuel is refined into several sub-categories or grades.  From highest to lowest (SEEMS WRONG WAY AROUND TO TICKLE) viscosity are Number 1 Diesel Fuel (1-D), Number 2 Diesel
Fuel (2-D) and Number 4 Fuel Diesel (4-D).  There used to be a Number 3 Diesel Fuel (3-D), but it is no longer refined.

Numbers 1 and 2 Diesel Fuel are the primary fuel for mobile diesel engine applications.  Number 1 Diesel Fuel is commonly labeled at the pump as "Premium Diesel" or with a Cetane number of 44 or 45.  It is not as thick as Number 2 Diesel Fuel and for this reason is the choice for motorists during the cold winter months.  The disadvantage of Number 1 Diesel Fuel is that it does not have the lubricating qualities associated with Number 2 Diesel Fuel. While Number 2 Diesel Fuel has a higher lubricating quality than Number 1 Diesel, its thickness can cause rough starting in a cold engine and rough-running in cold weather.  Number 2 Diesel Fuel is usually labeled at the pump with a Cetane number of 40.
 

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