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tc7 (Mechanical) (OP)
22 Jul 08 10:42
I need to develop a PQR/WPS for a 15-5Ph material and the applied Code is to be AWS D17.1

D17.1 kicks you into AWS B2.1 for guidance on procedure qualification and typical of most welding Codes and specifications that I have used, B2.1 requires Charpy's to be performed if the material specification cites impact requirements.

There does not seem to be any material specification for 15-5Ph listed in AWS B2.1, so in researching other 15-5Ph material specifications that I have found such as AMS 5862 and AMS 5659 do not cite an impact requirement requirement but ASTM A564 does list specific Charpy-V values for each heat treated condition.  

So, am I bound to have Charpy's done as part of my PQR or not? What do you think?
GRoberts (Materials)
22 Jul 08 19:10
It would depend on what specification was used to specify the material you are welding for production.  If your part is AMS 5862 or 5659, then no, but if A564 was specified, then yes.

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