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EffHeat (Mechanical) (OP)
30 May 08 12:15
Does anyone know where I can find a corrosion comparison of Corten vs. XTen-50.

TIA

Jeremiah
swall (Materials)
30 May 08 14:32
You need to state the intended service environment.
EffHeat (Mechanical) (OP)
30 May 08 15:27
Sorry,

Service is a centrifugal fan moving normal air.
metengr (Materials)
30 May 08 18:12
I would stick with Corten. This is a common weathering grade of steel plate used in large industrial axial and centrifugal fans.
EffHeat (Mechanical) (OP)
2 Jun 08 9:26
From what I understand, Xten-50 is the generic grade of Corten which many companies are using due to the lead time/cost of Corten.  So, unfortunately Corten is not always an option.  Although not exact, they have very similar properties but I have been unable to find a corrosion comparison which would give a good indication of longevity due to corrosion compared to Corten.  Is there such a thing published anywhere?

TIA
swall (Materials)
3 Jun 08 7:47
I believe that "Corten", "XTen" and "TriTen" are all registered to United States Steel Corp, so XTen is not what you would call generic. If you can get XTen with .5 copper content, the corrosion resistance in your application should mirror that of Corten.
corrosionman (Mechanical)
5 Jun 08 17:07
EffHeat,  A   few years ago I wanted a few tons of Corten in UK and was told "only available  if you want 1000 tons"  If it is the same in USA maybe the answer to your question is of accademic interest only  since you need a big number of fan blades for this amount of Steel.
Regards   CM
GRoberts (Materials)
5 Jun 08 20:24
Depending on your thicknesses and stenght levels you required, try searching for material under ASTM specs instead of trade names.  Try ASTM A588,  ASTM A606 type 2 or 4, or ASTM A709 Gr. 50W or HPS 70W.  All are considered "Weathering" grades of steel.  ASTM A606 gives a forumula to calculate the corrosion index for weathing steel, and could probably be used as a rough approximation.  A lot of weathing steel in the US goes into bridge structures.   If you search for data on weathing performance of bridges, you might be able to come up with some data.
enmax (Materials)
6 Jun 08 10:41
In Europe the CORTEN type weathering steels are covered by EN10155. As GRoberts says - you may have more luck tracking it down using generic national specifications.
Regards
EffHeat (Mechanical) (OP)
11 Jun 08 16:32
Thanks all for the info.

Corrosionman,

I am unsure of the quantity of material they use but I know they do use Corten and often use Xten-50 interchangeably.  Claiming that these materials are interchangeable is where the issue lies as a corrosion comparison is not something that they have been able to produce.  From reading, it is my understanding that these materials are interchangeable from a material strength standpoint, which I have documentation to support this, but they are not from a corrosion standpoint.  Although I am reluctant to find any supporting documentation.

Thanks again and anything else would help.
HgTX (Civil/Environmental)
23 Jun 08 15:27
I will repeat what the others repeat--you need to talk about material specifications, not trade names.  If the terms are being used generically, then it means absolutely nothing to quibble about corrosion data for one trade name vs. another.  In the end, these products are manufactured to a published standard, and they are under no obligation, no matter what past data may show, to produce to any level higher than that standard.  So either the published standard (for whatever brand you buy) meets your requirements, or it doesn't.

Right now the only COR-TEN® products I see listed on the U.S. Steel website are roofing materials.  I can't even find "Xten", but maybe I'm just searching badly.

Hg

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