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Looking for a spec that matches this composition

flitetestdummy (Aerospace) (OP)
12 Nov 07 15:28
I am reverse engineering a part that has the following chemical composition results from testing. Ideally I am looking for a north american spec but the original could be european.. Any suggestions (guesses??)

Carbon 0.31
Manganese 0.412
Sulfur 0.01
Phosphorous 0.012
Silicon 0.312
Nickel 3.38
Chromium 1.34
Molybdenum 0.439
Copper 0.084
Aluminum 0.007
Vanadium 0.007
Iron Balance
CoryPad (Materials)
12 Nov 07 16:50
Close matches are E9310 (see e.g. ASTM A 29), ASTM A 543 Grade C, and HY100 (see MIL-S-21952).

Regards,

Cory

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TVP (Materials)
12 Nov 07 17:20
There is no North American grade equivalent to this.  I believe that the only standard that officially references this grade is the French AFNOR NFA 35, which identifies it as 35NCD14.  A DIN grade designation and Werkstoff Nummer (material number) exist, but I do not know where they "appear" officially.  The cross-referencing guide Stahlschl├╝ssel gives these designations as 32NICrMo14-5 and 1.6746, respectively.
EdStainless (Materials)
12 Nov 07 18:39
What are the mechanical properties?  Strength and ductility will limit what your options are.
flitetestdummy (Aerospace) (OP)
13 Nov 07 9:59
Thanks for the sugestions. I have previously had 9310 suggested as the closest north american spec however I am concerned about the differences in the amount of carbon and moly.  The french spec does fit well and as the original components are European it sounds promising.

Ed, I have several components made from the material. I don't have all the material properties but they are all through hardened to 32-36HRC, 37-38HRC or 36-38HRC.

Any comments on the effect on the material with regard to material properties like fatigue or cold weather toughness of the different carbon and moly percentages between 9310 and 32NICrMo14-5???   ie are they close enough in properties that 9310 could be argued as an equivalent?
CoryPad (Materials)
13 Nov 07 14:16
E9310 is a carburizing grade.  You cannot achieve 32 HRC with this unless you add carbon during heat treatment.

HY100 really is the closest in terms of composition, properties, and end use.

Regards,

Cory

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TVP (Materials)
13 Nov 07 15:28
None of the grades that CoryPad provided can be considered as equivalent to 35NCD14.  They all have considerably lower carbon content.  35NCD16 is a higher Ni grade similar to 35NCD14 that is at least produced in the USA by one steel maker (Latrobe Steel).  If you need to find something equivalent, then I would suggest, otherwise you will need to contact European producers like Corus, Aubert & Duval, etc.

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