Member Login

Remember Me
Forgot Password?
Join Us!

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

Join Eng-Tips
*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.
Jobs from Indeed

Link To This Forum!

Partner Button
Add Stickiness To Your Site By Linking To This Professionally Managed Technical Forum.
Just copy and paste the
code below into your site.

Culmann's Method

Culmann's Method

Does anybody know where I could find a detailed procedure on how to perform Culmann's method in regards to anchored sheet pile retaining walls?  To eliminate any confusion, the procedure I am referring to analyzes the possibility of the anchor inducing a surcharge load on the retaining wall.

Another quick question on the same topic... Would the anchor slab/wall be considered "stable" if the base was below the natural slope (natural slope being a slope at an angle phi from the tip of the retaining wall)?


RE: Culmann's Method


Culmann's method is a graphical method using trial and error to locate the critical case for slope stability problems, especially when the backslope has non-uniform geometry.

The Caltrans Trenching and Shoring manual has several worked examples employing this approach and should not be too difficult to locate for download. It also has a good section on trenching and shoring adjacent to railroads, a subject that is not widely discussed in many texts or manuals.

The avaialble passive resistance below the dredge line/toe of the wall depends on the slope angle, spacing of the embedded elements and depth of embedment.


RE: Culmann's Method

jdonville:  cook

RE: Culmann's Method

Why don't you try with Talren software, with that you can analise any section that you need.

RE: Culmann's Method


Thanks for posting the link.


Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why the post below is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close