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RocketmanRay (Aerospace) (OP)
3 May 07 15:33
We’re struggling with the words in the OSHA documentation and the additional guidance in the CGA pamphlet for securing/storing K-bottles.

Specifically, is a rope adequate to restrain a compressed gas cylinder?  There are those of the opinion that rope is inadequate, and any time a compressed gas cylinder is on a dolly it requires a chain to keep the cylinders from being knock over.

Does anyone know if there are any physical descriptions of what is adequate to secure cylinders?

Thanks,
RM
 
MiketheEngineer (Structural)
3 May 07 21:30
What is the problem with a chain???

Chains don't get cut, rot, mildew or break down over time....

So spend a couple of dollars and replace them...
RocketmanRay (Aerospace) (OP)
4 May 07 13:10
Chain or rope isn’t the issue, it’s the physical description of the requirement in the OSHA; are there words that describe the requirements?

Not trying to be defensive, but we’re here on the east coast of Florida, a UV intensive (tough on the rope) and salt-laden corrosive environment (tough on the steel chain).

RM
safetydan (Industrial)
11 Jun 07 15:02
The location you provided is exactly why OSHA does not specify the material to be used to prevent the bottles from being knocked over.  You are allowed to use almost any material as long as you can PROVE it is substantial enough to prevent the bottles from falling.

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