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aeromatt (Aerospace) (OP)
14 Mar 07 11:35
Hello all,

I am planning to convert the roof in my garage from a standard triangular shaped truss roof into a vaulted ceiling roof. I would like to use a micro-lam beam down the length of the ridge for a span of about 22 ft and the width of the space is 24 ft. Walls are concrete block and the existing trusses are hand built.

If I wanted a portion of the roof to be left un-vaulted, would it be better to span the total length of the roof with the beam or could I terminate the ridge bean midspan and support it using an additional crossbeam and some posts?

Please share your opinions or even feel free to give step by step detail.

Thank you
MiketheEngineer (Structural)
14 Mar 07 12:09
You can make that idea work - carefully - you don't want to be on Home Videos..

I am guessing that the front of the of the micro-lam beam would terminate over the garage door??  You will need to address this load.  

While you are doing this - your roof will be virtually non-supportive of any loads and may even impart side thrust at the top of the walls.

Either figure on shoring or using some other method - like possibly rebuilding one truss at a time.

Think this out carefully.  Its doable but you might want to get a structural engineer to help you out.
aeromatt (Aerospace) (OP)
14 Mar 07 12:29
Thanks Mike - Yes, one end of the beam will be supported above a 9 ft opening. I will use steel or something to support this end since all the block will be removed here.

The current plan is to put all new support in place before removing any of the existing truss material.

I here on that amazing videos comment - but I better get the camera out just in case...
TheIbis (Structural)
19 Mar 07 7:09
It sounds like you would be better off using what we call a jack scab. It is a partial truss that matches the configuration of the existing truss, and also has the new bottom profile built it. You attach it to the existing truss , then cut out the area of the exist truss you no longer want.
It is quick and easy to do. Just about any truss company can design them for you. The down side is accessibility as wiring and mechanicals may be have to be temporarily moved. We find that even with the trouble of moving wiring and mechanicals, it still works out better than conventional framed repairs.
Trussme68 (Structural)
21 Mar 07 22:25
You have a lot of horizontal loads to deal with. I have seen this attempted and the garage ended up with the walls 3 inches out of plumb.

TheIbis has the right idea. We call them "scab frames" in Florida.

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