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shireen (Civil/Environmental) (OP)
17 Aug 05 9:16
I am working as a senior engineer, managing projects. I have a 2year b-tech (NHD) degree in structural engineering and a 3year diploma in civil engineering. I have over 10 years engineering experience both design and managing projects.

I would like to convert this b-tech degree to an engineering degree. The most preferable option would be part-time learning or even a short time full time course.

Are there any bridging courses available out there that facilitate fulltime working and part-time studying..can anyone please advise????
Helpful Member!  francesca (Civil/Environmental)
17 Aug 05 9:25
What country are you in?

There's no magic short course that turns a 2-year diploma into a 3- or 4-year degree.

In South Africa, a BTech is a 4-year diploma and it's equivalent to half-way through the second year of a 4-year degree.  It may be different where you are.
shireen (Civil/Environmental) (OP)
17 Aug 05 13:08
Thank you Francesca for your response, if you have any further advise, it would be most appreciated.Ive been in contact with a few universities and they have said the same.I may need to do another year and a half to get the BSc.
The trick is to find a part-time or distance learning engineering course.I cant see myself going back to full-time study with my commitments.

Is there anyone else in the eng-forum in a similar position?
francesca (Civil/Environmental)
17 Aug 05 15:13
Shireen,

What country are you in? It's very hard for people to advise you specifically if they don't know what country you're in!

Francesca
dicksewerrat (Civil/Environmental)
17 Aug 05 20:03
Start out by sitting down with an advisor at the school you want to go to. Find out what courses are offered online and at night. Also ask about transfer courses that you can get at night. I went to school nights for 6 years to get my degree.
shireen (Civil/Environmental) (OP)
18 Aug 05 8:46
Thanks guys for your advise.I qualified in SA.The btech was 2year part-time after the 3year full time diploma.But im now working living and working in europe.Can you advise on any night universities or distance learning.I am able to find distance learning MSc's but nothing on the BSc.

I guess my main reason for wanting to pursue the BSc would be to be able to sign off on designs.I feel that the B-tech has its limitations.Perhaps im wrong.
francesca (Civil/Environmental)
18 Aug 05 9:16
Yay another South African!

A recent thread spoke about the CEng process in the UK, and how "technicians" are also able to become a CEng.  You should contact the ICE in London and find out about that process; it may well be quicker and cheaper than getting a degree.  Furthermore, you might be eligible to do a Masters' degree; contact a university to find out.  The education requirements for CEng/MICE status are moving toward a Masters degree.

Of course, if you're not the UK things may be different.
henri2 (Materials)
18 Aug 05 18:21
In the country you work, are you able to sign off on drawings with a degree in engineering rather than a chartered/licensed engineer's seal?

Check the regulations regarding the practice of civil engineering in the country you work. I am sure they have boards/institutions which govern the practice of civil engineering.

If you are working in the UK and want a degree through the distance-learning route, try the Open University, UK. http://www.open.ac.uk/
shireen (Civil/Environmental) (OP)
19 Aug 05 5:02
You guys are just brilliant, for being so helpful.thanks.I know that there are alot more engineers in a similar position to me.

Im going to put a call through to ICE & ECSA ( Francesca (F) you should know this body) and see what they have to say.If I could sit an exam to raise the weight of my qualification, then that will be brilliant.I would love to experience full student life again & do the Bsc full time, but my present "life" commitments dont permit.And if it wont make much of a difference to my present standing, then there's nopoint.

If I have no joy with ICE or ECSA, my other preference would be distance learning.Il check out that site Henri2.Thanks.Do you guys know if any of the South African universities offer a more flexible engineering study program eg part-time Bsc or Msc.
francesca (Civil/Environmental)
19 Aug 05 12:18
I studied at UCT and I know that they don't have any part-time or distance learning BSc (Eng) courses.  UNISA is the main (only?) distance learning university in South Africa, but I doubt that they have an engineering program.  You should contact UCT, because they may accept UNISA credits in combination with your BTech credits.  There were three or four guys who studied with me who already had the BTech (mostly from Cape Tech).  

I have friends who have studied through UNISA out of London (they took their exams in London, and paid a little extra for the privilege.) Most universities have a limit to the number of transfer credits you can have in order to graduate from their institution; I think it's half for UCT. Remember that with your BTech, you'd already get credit for first year and half of second year.  You might be able to take your electives through UNISA, but these only amounted to about 12 credits (three or four half-year courses).

Here is a link to all the BSc courses offered by UNISA.  They don't offer Civil Engineering. This is UCT's Civil Engineering department home page. It's I had most of those professors for most of those courses (1996-1998!) and can highly recommend them.  

From the main UCT page you can navigate to the Faculty of Engineering and the Built Environment page, which will allow you to download the Faculty Handbook.  This should (used to) give details of the requirements for BTech graduates.

Good luck.

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