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rpatel (Mechanical) (OP)
11 Aug 05 13:35
Is there any website where I can find a cross reference
of the steel designation such as ASTM, JIS, SS, CL.
I need to find specification of SS400 and 380CL compare
to ASTM A1011.
Thanks
adamtom (Mechanical)
11 Aug 05 20:14
By the way,I also want to know the specification of Armco iron. Is someone can help me?  
Best regard.
Helpful Member!  EdStainless (Materials)
12 Aug 05 13:01
As far as I know RPatel, you need to buy some books.  A 10th edition of the UNS handbook and one of the good spec cross index.
Of course, nothing beats owning the ASTM specs that you are working with.

I recall that ASTM A848 is for pure magnet iron.  I don't have a copy since I don't use it any more.  There is a UNS for commercially pure iron, K00095.  Thisi s basically 99.5% with Cu being the major impurity.  There are also a number of steels with special magetic properties, K00600, K00800, K01000 (the number is the carbon level with K00600 = 0.06 max C).   I don't know of any ASTM specs that ref these UNS values.
I am trying to recall, but I think that Armco A was 99.5%, as the C goes down you get high O2 and such.  There are vacuum melted irons out there that are 99.95%.

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