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waskillywabbit (Mechanical) (OP)
27 Jun 05 13:56
My driveway is less than 5 years old and there is no surface cracking, so the driveway currently appears solid.  It slopes at about 30 degrees all the way to the road and is divided into (3) sections, approximately 10 feet in lenght and wide enough to park (2) vehicles on.  On the sides the driveway slopes away, but not severely but it does not consistently match the slope of the yard, if that makes sense.  I noticed some holes on both sides next to the driveway and upon further inspection while putting in a flower bed I noticed the cavitation under the center section.  Probably a good 2-6" gap in certain places that seems to run from the top of the center section down.  I really couldn't see a great deal w/ a flashlight, but I imagine it is a lot worse than I could completely see.  Whenever it rains there is always red clay/dirt running down the gutter from my driveway, so it is obviously eroding away.  I need to somehow fill in this cavitation before it gets any worse and I really don't want to have to tear up the driveway, as I don't think my homeowner's insurance would cover it, and I don't want the big expense. Is there a way to fix this before my driveway caves in or starts to crack so bad that it has to be torn up and replaced?

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

Brian
Pressure Vessels and Autoclave Systems
www.mcabeeconstruction.com

The above comments/opinions are solely my own and not those of McAbee Construction.

jike (Structural)
27 Jun 05 14:28
Mud jacking is the way to fill in the void under the slab. There should be Mud Jacking contractors listed in the phone book if you are near a reasonable size city.

The erosion problem, however, will continue and also needs a solution otherwise it most likely will continue. Is there a way to cut off the flow of water down the hill or divert it?
waskillywabbit (Mechanical) (OP)
27 Jun 05 14:36
I recently added gutters to the front of my home to direct the water flow off the driveway when it rains, as the slopes of the room came together right over a corner of the top of my driveway and dumped extra gallons of water on the driveway.  The driveway now only just sees normal rain fall, not all the water off the roof as well, so I think that will help a great deal with the amount of water that was eroding the soil.  Now to just get "mud jacked".  I'll search for that one online here.  Never heard of that before, but thanks for the 411.

Brian
Pressure Vessels and Autoclave Systems
www.mcabeeconstruction.com

The above comments/opinions are solely my own and not those of McAbee Construction.

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