INTELLIGENT WORK FORUMS
FOR ENGINEERING PROFESSIONALS

Come Join Us!

Are you an
Engineering professional?
Join Eng-Tips Forums!
  • Talk With Other Members
  • Be Notified Of Responses
    To Your Posts
  • Keyword Search
  • One-Click Access To Your
    Favorite Forums
  • Automated Signatures
    On Your Posts
  • Best Of All, It's Free!

*Eng-Tips's functionality depends on members receiving e-mail. By joining you are opting in to receive e-mail.

Posting Guidelines

Promoting, selling, recruiting, coursework and thesis posting is forbidden.

Jobs

Link To This Forum!

Partner Button
Add Stickiness To Your Site By Linking To This Professionally Managed Technical Forum.
Just copy and paste the
code below into your site.

Chamfer Callout?

Chamfer Callout?

(OP)
what is the standard for a callout of a chamfer feature?  is it to call out the note with a leader (.25 x 45°) or to add two seperate dimensions (one linear and one angle)?

Thanks in advance

SolidWorks 2005 SP01.1
Intel Xeon 2.8GHz 2GB Ram
NVIDIA Quadro FX700 128MB

RE: Chamfer Callout?

Either way is allowable.
Per ASME Y14.5M-1994, Chamfers may be dimensioned by a linear dimension and an angle, or by two linear dimensions.  If it is a 45 degree chamfer, a note may be used.

RE: Chamfer Callout?

ewh is correct. In addition, sometimes a chamfer may have to be separate dim's. If it is ".02x60°", there is no way of knowing which direction the 60° is coming from. It could end up as a 30°. So, sometimes you have to dim the distance and and angle as separate dims.
Also, I believe the new way to dim an angle is without the word "cham" or "chamfer", just the dim ".02x60°".

Chris
Sr. Mechanical Designer, CAD
SolidWorks 05 SP2.0 / PDMWorks 05
ctopher's home site
FAQ371-376
FAQ559-1100
FAQ559-1091
FAQ559-716

RE: Chamfer Callout?

(OP)
Thanks guys

SolidWorks 2005 SP01.1
Intel Xeon 2.8GHz 2GB Ram
NVIDIA Quadro FX700 128MB

RE: Chamfer Callout?

Good clarification, Chris.  On a related note, which comes first in a chamfer note, the dimension or the angle?  The spec example shows the dimension first, but since it is not spelled out (and some of their examples are vague) I've had difficulty in the past proving to others that this is the correct method.  I realize that I am getting close to being anal here, but it would be nice to know.  Any thoughts on this?

RE: Chamfer Callout?

I have always used dim first, then angle. Most machine shops I have talked to say they measure the distance first then cut the angle. I will have to look again to see if it is in a spec.

Chris
Sr. Mechanical Designer, CAD
SolidWorks 05 SP2.0 / PDMWorks 05
ctopher's home site
FAQ371-376
FAQ559-1100
FAQ559-1091
FAQ559-716

RE: Chamfer Callout?

All,
Chamfers are now properly called out with the distance first and the angle second, .25 X 45 deg per ASME Y14.5M-1994.  Previously, ANSI Y14.5M-1982 had them the other way around, "angle X distance".  As a memory jogger for the proper order, I think of the word "dangle".  Chamfer notes 'dangle' on a leader off the end of the shaft and are specifed as Distance X ANGLE.

Many of my machinist friends and I still can't figure out why it was changed since "it wasn't broken" before.

RedPen

Red Flag This Post

Please let us know here why this post is inappropriate. Reasons such as off-topic, duplicates, flames, illegal, vulgar, or students posting their homework.

Red Flag Submitted

Thank you for helping keep Eng-Tips Forums free from inappropriate posts.
The Eng-Tips staff will check this out and take appropriate action.

Reply To This Thread

Posting in the Eng-Tips forums is a member-only feature.

Click Here to join Eng-Tips and talk with other members!


Resources

White Paper: Agile Product Engineering and Improved Product Outcomes
Today’s product development cycle is fraught with difficulties. Increased demands for complex functionality and reduced product development windows cause engineering teams to borrow practices from the IT industry, swapping outdated serial workflows for a more flexible and collaborative design method known as Agile Product Engineering. Download Now

Close Box

Join Eng-Tips® Today!

Join your peers on the Internet's largest technical engineering professional community.
It's easy to join and it's free.

Here's Why Members Love Eng-Tips Forums:

Register now while it's still free!

Already a member? Close this window and log in.

Join Us             Close