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FSS (Structural) (OP)
8 Oct 04 13:44
Let's say Engineer A signs and seals building design and is therefore the EOR for the project.  During construction the contractor makes a substitution which requires engineering approval.  Engineer A is on vacation (lucky guy) and Engineer B designs the fix and issues with his seal on it.  Since both engineers work for the same company, are there any EOR conflicts?  

Wondering how other folks lucky enough to have multiple PE's in the same office handle plan revisions, letters, etc., that come up on a project.  
Helpful Member!  SlideRuleEra (Structural)
8 Oct 04 15:09
South Carolina, and probably most states, solved this problem a few years ago. The company that the engineer works for must obtain a Certificate of Authorization (COA) from the state. This allows the company to purchase a numbered seal that looks similar to to PE seal - the company pays an annual fee for the COA - no testing involved. Both the PE seal and the COA seal must appear on the drawings. It does not matter which individual PE seals the documents - because of the COA the company is still "on the hook" even if the individual leaves employment.
The only exception to the COA requirement is if an individual PE does business as a sole proprietor, s/he does not need the COA in this event.
I have a one person (me) Limited Liability Company, but on the occasions when I need to seal drawings, I use both my PE seal and the company COA.
Ron (Structural)
8 Oct 04 17:39
FSS....would suggest that Engineer A write a short note to file that Engineer B provided the design for the Field Change Request in his absence and that he has reviewed and concurs with the design (assuming he does!).  This keeps the EOR path clean.

In some respects it is like delegated work.  In some states, the EOR officially delegates certain work (steel connection design, supplementary structure design (canopies and other manufactured items), etc.)and receives and reviews the delegated function, then accepts as the EOR.  In your case it is like an unofficial delegation (he went on vacation and left Engineer B to fend for him)so similar criteria would apply.  The Florida Statute on Engineering spells out the function and duties of each in a delegated situation.

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